Albert LEBOURG

1849 (Montfort-sur Risle) - 1928 (Rouen)

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Biography

Albert LEBOURG

Albert Lebourg is characterised by the epithet Impressionist, with all that this expression conveys in the way of talent, refinement, and reserve. He fully understood the poetic quality of Impressionism and the benefits it brought to painting.

Lebourg started his studies as a student of Architecture but after meeting the Rouen landscape painter Delamarre, Lebourg orientated himself to working as an artist. In his taste for landscapes seen through monochromatic skies, he follows in the tradition of Boudin and Jongkind. His origins and education (Rouen Fine-Art School) explain the harmony between his perception and the reality of the landscapes of the Seine Valley.

In 1872 Lebourg exhibited in Rouen and then decided to take up a post as Drawing Professor in Algeria. For the five next years, during his stay in Algiers, he painted series of pictures exploiting the Arabian theme (Arab Fountain, Moorish Café). Lebourg, however, remained true to Impressionism and did not draw from these series any of the extreme conclusions reached by Monet at that same time. His Impressionism is never provocative; it is, rather, a discreet harmony of half tones with the vibration of light-filled atmosphere. In him Paris found one of its most sympathetic interpreters, because he knew exactly how to remain scrupulously exact without being banal.

Lebourg travelled extensively throughout France gathering inspiration for his paintings. In the 1880's when Lebourg was exhibiting at the Salon des Artistes Francais, he concentrated on painting land and seascapes in Dieppe, Honfleur and Boulogne. In 1894 Lebourg was elected a member of the Societé Nationale des Beaux-Arts. The same year his wife died, it affected him so profoundly he was unable to paint for months. In 1920, Lebourg decided to return to Rouen but was taken ill in the September and in 1928 died there after eight years of disease.